Angel Street Capital has invested in CMP.LY’s Series Seed Preferred Stock offering.  Tech Crunch coverage of the CMP.LY  funding can be viewed at

CMP.LY’s patent-pending system of iconic compliance tools is the first, and only, commercial solution to address the unique challenges of disclosure in social media. CMP.LY codes and badges provide clear disclosure on their own and also link back to complete disclosures as required for regulatory needs and documented best practices. CMP.LY makes it easy for marketers to include the disclosures required by the FTC and the OFT in sponsored blog posts, Facebook updates, and even Tweets.  The company is developing similar tools to allow companies to comply with FDA, SEC/FINRA and other regulations. The company also provides tools to document and report on compliance and measure campaign-specific ROI.


There have been a number of recent developments in Internet Radio:

  • Pandora has filed to go public and raise $100 million
  • Spotify has concluded deals with leading U.S. record labels and announced a $100 Million equity raise
  • Rdio announced it had received $17.5 million in funding.
  • Slacker raised $3 Million in additional financing
  • Clear Channel Radio acquired cloud based music system Thumbplay

During 2010:

  • 2/26/10 MOG raised $9.5 Million
  • Grooveshark raised $3.5 Million

Internet radio takes two forms, subscription model (all you can eat for low monthly fee or pay for no ads) and advertiser supported.  There are pros and cons to both the consumer and the business model for both forms.   In general I would favor the ad supported model but Internet radio companies such as Pandora pay a significant amount in music royalties thus making the business model less attractive.

I find it ridiculous that terrestrial radio executives and Sirius/XM don’t believe that they are in competition with Internet radio or that listeners don’t want a personalized experience.   Customization can be actively managed (Pandora) or derived from one’s social media graph.  I do understand that radio groups still derive 95% of their revenue from terrestrial and this is where they need to devote the bulk of their resources.  However, they must be prepared (literally) for what is coming down the road.

When talking about music with my 16 year old son, I asked him how he learns about new music.  He had two responses; 1) Facebook (when his friends “like” a song or artist and 2) www.  The later is a site containing new artists or mixes/mashes curated by an individual.  A shift from professional curation (the PD) to crowd sourcing and opinion molders has taken place.  My son does listen to terrestrial radio in the car but he seems to already know just about every song that is being played and on only two occasions can I remember when he was excited about something he did not immediately recognize.   Of course terrestrial radio playlists are extensively tested to weed out anything he would not recognize and like.  On the way to school this morning (a 20 minute ride) I counted 72 changes of radio frequency due to commercials or monotonous jock talk.  He was searching for music.  This is a broken search function model which will be fixed in car dashboard 2.0.

XM/Sirius does have some unique content not available elsewhere (e.g. Howard Stern) that consumers are going to continue to want.  XM/Sirius is a different distribution system with the advantage being ubiquitous across the U.S.  I question whether their all-music channels can compete unless of course there is no Internet connectivity.


There has been an explosion in Deal a Day companies led by Groupon and Living Social.  BIA/Kelsey estimates 2010 revenue for the industry at $873 Million and revenue continuing to grow in double digits.  Deal a Day sites continue to add markets and many are establishing a local sales force.  Coupons are attractive and can result in businesses attracting new visitors through the offer.  In addition, business owners can easily quantify and measure the quality of the response, e.g. did it lead to other product sales.  There has been criticism as to whether the bulk of coupon buyers are existing customers, while in part true, it also contributes to existing customer loyalty.

While some would argue that Deal a Day companies should be lumped in with Direct Mail, I believe Deal a Day companies do compete with radio for marketing dollars.  Their establishment of a local sales force is highly troubling to the radio industry already struggling to eek out positive revenue growth.  Many companies such as, Deal Current, Second Street Media, Tippr, TownHog and others are aligning themselves with radio.  These radio aligned Deal a Day companies will help those more innovative radio companies obtain a share of this market and reduce the risk of revenue loss.